Community College and Engineering

Community colleges in America were designed as a way to level the playing field by allowing people from lower income social groups to enter tertiary education. Community college tuition fees are less than half of State Universities in America. The idea is that two years in a community college entitles a student to enroll on a bachelor degree course. This is more expensive but the rewards of finding a job with a good salary make the risk worth taking.

It is thus a shame that over half of people who enroll in community college don’t go on to graduate from another educational establishment with a bachelor degree. Instead they are settling for finding lower paid work instead.

State and Federal governments have to do something to address this failing in the system. At present it is perpetuating and reinforcing the class differences in America that are based in socio-economic backgrounds.

One important field that is growing at a fast rate is design and engineering. America needs more qualified engineers to keep up with the ever involving technological landscape. It is predicted that in 20 years there will be a grave shortage of computer scientists and computer engineers. The IT sector is booming and presents a great employment opportunity for young people. Engineering offers good remuneration packages and often the chance to participate on projects that are of great importance.

Rather than settling on being a car mechanic after a year or two in community college we must find a way to incentivize education to make that hypothetical young person become a mechanical engineer instead. It is right for the person and it is right for the country.

Finally, we must make engineering and design interesting. This is what websites such as http://www.theninjaproxy.org/ are attempting to do.