Studying in Russia – Admission Rules Change

There’s sweeping changes planned to academic requirements for foreigners wanting to study in a Russian college. The Education and Science Ministry are dew to publish these new requirements by the end of 2014. All international students (i.e from outside Russia) will need to spend an additional year learning Russian, Mathematics and a selection of key subjects in their chosen fields. This will only then give the students the right to take the entrance exam of their chosen university.

The applicants will have to choose between four sets or subject areas for their studies initially – humanities, computer science, maths, sciences or economics. These sets will have three individual subjects and one specialist subject for study. This foundation phase will also cover some general knowledge and Russian language basics.

The Russian course will also include Russian authors and literature like Pushkin, Turgenev and others. The foundation course will covers two or three pieces of work from about 8 famous Russian authors.

There are actually a lot of Foreign students studying in Russia, latest estimates suggest about 250,000. Many are heavily subsidized by the Russian Government – some 40,000 pay no fees at all.

The reasons these changes are being implemented are simply because of the very diverse source of these students. Many have varying levels of education which makes it difficult to teach in a group or class format. It is expected that the measures will not only improve the standard of Russian education but increase the profiles of Russian education abroad.

It is no doubt though that the changes make studying in Russia a much bigger commitment especially those who have to pay their own fees. An extra 12 months living and studying costs can be significant especially in expensive Cities like Moscow. You should consider carefully any application and make sure it is the right thing to do. Many prospective students spend a lot of time in preparation, learning Russian before they go and trying to get involved in the culture. One hady tip is to invest in a short term service of a Russian proxy so you can access Russian only sites like this –

Obviously it’s not quite the same as being there, but it does help soften the culture shock that students may have from different backgrounds. Although there are many foreign students studying in Russia, many are from the old Soviet Union or Poland and so cultural differences will not be as pronounced as if you are coming from London or Chicago!